January 2014



Mochrum Fell Windfarm – The Facts

Posted (January 13, 2014)

Coriolis Energy / Falck Renewables currently have a planning application in place for an 33 MW Windfarm on Mochrum Fell. What follows is our letter of support detailing the benefits the scheme will bring to the local economy, community and environment. This letter was sent to the planners in support of the application.


Dear Sirs,

13/P/2/0327 – MOCHRUM FELL WINDFARM

I am writing to register my support for the development of the above wind farm. I believe that wind is a valuable resource that can help reduce carbon emissions and protect the environment for future generations.

As one of the landowners who would benefit from this scheme I am not impartial. I am however running a diverse business that that must be sustainable if it is to continue to support the local economy be that through employment, affordable housing, or primary production. Renewables have a key role to play in diversification. We are also local residents and have been so since 1884. We live here because we love it and consequently the lease agreement between the developer / operator underwent a great deal of scrutiny. People are entitled to their opinion but they must know the facts. I have therefore decide to summaries some of the key points from the impartially created Environmental Impact Assessment, a 1000+ page document detailing the specifics of the scheme.

 Visual Impact – On studying the photo representation from 21 designated sites it is clear the turbines have been carefully sited to respect logistical, economic and environmental sensitivities; in many of the visuals the turbines are barely visible due to the clever use of topography. The initial size and number of turbines has also been reduced considerably. I would also like to add these structures are not permanent features on our landscape with an operational lifespan of 25 years after which the land is reinstated.

 Ecological Impacts – There assessment states there are no significant ecological impacts on habitats and the various species living within these habitats. Nor are there any significant risks to geology, hydrogeology, or hydrology. If anything the biodiversity may be being improved with the planting of more biodiversity woodland to offset removed timber. Archaeological mitigation will also offset the potential loss of any archaeological resources’.

 Noise / Flicker Impacts Background noise levels are within the government endorsed guidelines and flicker will not cause a material reduction in residential amenity at properties within 1030m.

Aviation and Telecom Impacts Clearly considered and mitigated with no significant impact.

 Access, Traffic, Transport: Clearly considered and mitigated with no significant impacts. Unlike many other schemes new roads are not being created within the option area as many of the roads already exists and only require a small upgrade.

 Socio-economic Impacts The construction phase of the project will support 235 full time jobs in Scotland (75 of these in Dumfries and Galloway). Once operational it will support 15 full time jobs (6 of these in Dumfries and Galloway). Scottish Government Research conducted on tourists also states that 75% of tourists believe wind farms have a beneficial or neutral impact on the landscape. The developer has also agreed to a community benefit fund of £5000 per MWof installed capacity for the operational lifespan of the farm. The proposed capacity is 33MW that would make available £165,000 per annum for local projects or rather £4,125,000 throughout its operational lifespan.

It is clearly evident that the scheme has been well designed with no significant residual effects predicted by the ecology; ornithology; geology; hydrology and hydrogeology; access, traffic and transport; aviation; noise; socio-economics; or shadow and forest assessments. I have professional confidence in the developer and the operator. It will benefit the local economy through investment and employment throughout its 25-year operational life span.

Yours Sincerely

OSCAR YERBURGH